1. "My analog watches are my reminder that utility exists apart from an internet connection and usefulness doesn’t require the latest software."

    Dumb — Shawn Blanc
  2. My friend Julio Ojeda-Zapata is taking photos of the new Mac Pro next to all kinds of other previous Macs and posting them to his Google Plus account. So cool.

    My friend Julio Ojeda-Zapata is taking photos of the new Mac Pro next to all kinds of other previous Macs and posting them to his Google Plus account. So cool.

  3. Apple iSight — Minimally Minimal →

    Andrew Kim continues to knock it out of the park with these reviews of some of Apple’s older products. I actually still have one of these that I can’t bear to part with. One of the most beautiful objects Apple ever designed.

  4. Unclutter your tech with the Rule of One | Unclutterer →

    I don’t need all four camera apps, for instance, and should decide on one “keeper.” The rest are clutter in that they consume precious storage space on my iPhone and clutter my mind, as I must stop and choose one every time I want to take a picture.

    As DEVO once sang, “Freedom of choice is what you got. Freedom from choice is what you want”.

  5. iPod Shuffle →

    In terms of design, I think Apple got it right with the first gen Shuffle. It is super light weight, but not too small to hold. Yet, it is very easy to pocket.
    I’ve always been a big proponent of putting still useful technology to work for as long as it lasts. My buddy Steve decided to dig out his first gen Shuffle and put it back into service. Good for him.
  6. So, I ended up acquiring one of the ChargeKey Lightning-to-USB cables that I reblogged a few days ago. And, I have to say it is a handy little thing to have. I have used it at least once a day since I received it.
There are many times when I’m on the go with nothing more than my iPhone and, due to the day, I find myself in need of a quick charge. I have a USB power adapter in my car but usually not a cable with me. Well, now I do. It adds no more bulk than another key would on a keyring and is just as light. It appears to be pretty durable as well, And though the Lightning and USB plugs have been stripped to the bare essentials, they connect firmly when plugged in. They also sell a USB-to-Micro USB version for you users of, well, non-Apple made phones and devices.
No matter what, this is a neat idea and useful thing and well worth a look.

    So, I ended up acquiring one of the ChargeKey Lightning-to-USB cables that I reblogged a few days ago. And, I have to say it is a handy little thing to have. I have used it at least once a day since I received it.

    There are many times when I’m on the go with nothing more than my iPhone and, due to the day, I find myself in need of a quick charge. I have a USB power adapter in my car but usually not a cable with me. Well, now I do. It adds no more bulk than another key would on a keyring and is just as light. It appears to be pretty durable as well, And though the Lightning and USB plugs have been stripped to the bare essentials, they connect firmly when plugged in. They also sell a USB-to-Micro USB version for you users of, well, non-Apple made phones and devices.

    No matter what, this is a neat idea and useful thing and well worth a look.

  7. (Source: doanepaper)

  8. Apple’s stuff continues to just work →

    One of the most important things that keeps me glued to Apple’s hardware and software ecosystem is the fact that, the vast majority of the time, things just work.

    Yep. In fact, I was recently reminded of this too.

    I had a client this week who bought her first Mac after years of using a Windows PC. I told her what I tell a lot of people who are making the switch. On Windows, you get used to things being as unintuitive and hard as possible. You run into something you want to do or some setting you would like to change and your first instinct becomes looking for it through some obscure, poorly-labeled, dialog, filled with tabs that change position when you click on them, that is only accessible through a right click. One of the things you have to do, when switching to Mac, is to force yourself to think differently in such situations. You should stop, take a step back, and ask, “In an ideal world, where would this setting be? How would this work? What would it be called?”. On a Mac, nine times out of ten, it is exactly where you think it should be. Things work exactly the way you think they should.

    I have given this advice countless times over the twenty years of my consulting business. And, from those I have given it to, almost everyone has told me it was the thing that made the transition to Mac the easiest. That they never cease being amazed by the “magic” of things just working.

    I think those of us who have long used Macs forget how special that is.

  9. The Mobile Writer an eBook by Julio Ojeda-Zapata at the Kindle Store →

    Since we are on the subject of writing, I wanted to once again mention a great resource for getting the most out of writing with a mobile device — The Mobile Writer by Julio Ojeda-Zapata.

    I write the foreword for this and, as one who has kind of become known as “the guy who writes on his iPhone”, I am featured often throughout. That said, even if this were not true I would say, for only $3.00, this good bang for your bucks.

    Following, is the foreword I wrote to give you a peek at what it is all about. Enjoy:

    "You’re doing which with what?"

    This was, more often than not, the response I got last year when I first mentioned to people that I was writing a book on my iPad.

    "So you are writing a book about your iPad?"

    "No", I would say. "I’m writing a book and doing so entirely using my iPad."

    ""Ah, so you must be using one of those fancy Bluetooth keyboards they sell for it."

    "Actually, I’m only using the onscreen keyboard."

    "OK, that’s just crazy! Why would you want to do that?"

    "Several reasons", I’d explain. "I want to prove that the iPad is a perfectly capable computer for getting real work done. I also want to find out how such constrains affect my writing. Would it cause me to work slower, be more careful, and omit needless words? As someone who tries to promote, and is writing a book about, working with just enough of what one needs, the iPad alone seemed enough for the task. Plus, it’s a really good marketing angle for the book."

    "So it’s just a stunt then? To sell the book?"

    "No", I would insist. "I actually write most everything now this way. I quite enjoy it. In fact, if it’s something that will be a thousand words or less, I most often do that on my iPhone with my thumbs."

    It’s a wonder someone did not call the proper authorities to have me committed at this point in the conversation…

    Nothing crazy about it though, the iPad and iPhone, seem to me to be the perfect writing machines. They are regularly always with you so they allow you to start writing almost anytime and anywhere. When one can let go of the fear and let built in tools like auto-correct help, you might be surprised how fast one can become on the built in keyboard. But, as explained, part of the benefit is that it also can slow one down just enough to be more intentional with the words they choose and careful about the accuracy of the typing. I actually find I make less typos and am more quick to catch those I do when doing so in this way. In short, the iPad and iPhone help me write more often, in more situations, and write better.

    In the time since I wrote a book on my iPad, the number of great writing apps available for both platforms has exploded. Many are so good that I prefer them over any of their similar desktop computer counterparts. From minimalist plain text editors to full-fledged word processing and page layout alternatives, there is a writing app out there to fit any need. And, perhaps even more importantly, these devices are seen even more by the general public as equal tools for getting the job done.

    This is all to say that one owes it to themselves to give it a shot. Make the effort to realize the powerful creative tool these devices can be. I hope the coming chapters may help you down that path. If nothing else, you will have a new alternative. But, like me, you just may find an exciting new way to write.

    Patrick Rhone
    09.15.2013

    Sent from my iPad mini

  10. Some Thoughts About Writing — A Minimal Guide is my new collection of back pocket wisdom for those who wish to be successful writers. This guide will give you all you need to know about what it takes — especially for those looking to write for an online audience.
In addition, the eBook is a “living” guide. It will be updated as more questions, feedback, thoughts, and topic ideas not yet covered come up. The book currently contains a lot more than the preview I link to below. And there are even more great sections to come. As updates are made, those who have purchased a copy will receive notification of future versions available free download.
You can buy a copy right now for only $5.00.
You can also preview quite a bit of what’s included in the book.
Either way, it’s a bargain.

    Some Thoughts About Writing — A Minimal Guide is my new collection of back pocket wisdom for those who wish to be successful writers. This guide will give you all you need to know about what it takes — especially for those looking to write for an online audience.

    In addition, the eBook is a “living” guide. It will be updated as more questions, feedback, thoughts, and topic ideas not yet covered come up. The book currently contains a lot more than the preview I link to below. And there are even more great sections to come. As updates are made, those who have purchased a copy will receive notification of future versions available free download.

    You can buy a copy right now for only $5.00.

    You can also preview quite a bit of what’s included in the book.

    Either way, it’s a bargain.